click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
at a quarry in scotland. but, many as a matter of principle refused alternative service as well. and they were sent to prison. more than 6000 young englishman went to prison during the war. the largest number of people up to that point in time ever in prison for political reasons in a western democracy. they served their sentences in places like wandsworth prison in the photograph here, in southwest london. those that you can see stretched across the opening there is to prevent people from committing suicide. prison conditions were extremely harsh. prisoners lived under what was called the rule of silence, where you were not allowed to talk to your fellow prisoners. they found ways around it of course, tapping on cell walls and whispering to people and whatnot, but they lived several years under those conditions. the diet with terrible. there was a shortage of coal. the prisons were very cold. many people died in prison. so, i was fascinated by these war resisters. for the longest time, i could not figure out how, from a storytelling point of view, i was going to get the resisters and the gene
in scotland but as a matter of principle refuse to alternative services as well and sent to prison. more than 6,000 young englishmen went to prison during the war. the largest number of people up to the point* in time ever imprisoned for political reasons, they serve the sentences in places like here coming southwest london, that metal netting stretching across the opening is to prevent people from committing suicide. and prison conditions were extremely harsh. prisoners lived under the rule of silence rerun not allowed to talk to our fellow prisoners. they found ways around a buy tapping and whispering but to live under those conditions was tough. the diet was terrible, shortage comment it was cold and many people died in prison. i was fascinated by the stories. for the longest time i could not figure out how from a story telling point* of view i would get the resistors and the generals into the same book. i did not want to do a series of portraits of one then the other but then a clue came to me one day when i wis reading a scholarly article about a well-known pacifist. she was the ardent o
. as opposed to, you know, white americans being from scotland or norway or -- >> guest: well, i think so, yes. i mean, it's a country. we belong to the, we belong to a nation. and so, um, and it's one that's still there functioning. you know, we haven't left it. and we can't leave it. i mean, it's who we are. >> host: this e-mail from ricardo from texas, how hard was it to get published for the first time? >> guest: well, i think i was very fortunate the first time because, um, i sent some poems to the greenfield review and joe bruschak. he, also, is a great writer and an editor. and he said, do you have any more? and i said, yes. so i sent my, more poems to him. and he made them into a book. and so that little book which doesn't exist, t out of print now -- it's out of print now but "calling myself home" was my first publication. and then i also was publishing in magazines. and it's almost as if there's a process. you usually start with small magazines, small presses and then, you know, just keep going until somebody recognizes your name. because they've seen it enough and then, you know, la
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)